Person:
Cronshaw, Darren

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dcronshaw@acom.edu.au
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Cronshaw
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Darren

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Now showing 1 - 10 of 60
  • Publication
    We are Pilgrims: Mission from, in and with the Margins of our Diverse world
    2015-04 Dewerse, Rosemary ; Langmead, Alison ; Cronshaw, Darren ; Wieland, George ; Capper, Christy ; Chan, Samuel ; Yang, Meewon ; Vreugdenhil, Elizabeth ; Davison, Karyl ; Dow, Jasmine ; Koks, Immanuel ; Jones, Lewis ; McConnell, T Mark ; Barker, James A. ; Litchfield, Scott ; Humble, Graeme ; Wilson, Stacey ; Dah, Ner ; Khia, Si ; Kuung, Arohn ; Lian, Japheth ; van Dalen, Pauline Kim ; Cronshaw, Darren J. ; Dewerse, Rosemary
    Proceedings from third triennial conference of the Australian Association of Mission Studies (Adelaide October 2014), dedicated to Dr Ross Langmead.
  • Publication
    “ASK ANYTHING”: DEVELOPING A RELATIONAL PLATFORM TO MOBILISE CHRISTIANS TO SHARE THEIR FAITH THROUGH EXPLORING QUESTIONS
    (Witness: The Journal of the Academy for Evangelism in Theological Education ; 28 ) 2014-06 Stephenson, Dale ; Cronshaw, Darren
    “Ask Anything” was designed by Dale Stephenson and trialled at Crossway Baptist Church as a relational platform to mobilise Australian Christians to share their faith through exploring questions. There is a pressing need for locally produced resources to help Christians overcome a crisis of confidence or blind spot about evangelism. This 5-session DVD-based course is follows a question-based format with content that is intentionally pre-Alpha. It is relational and designed to be accessible and transferable in format so that it can be put in the hands of the people of God and go viral in spreading the gospel. The short DVDs and lots of time for further questions ensure sessions are interactive and dialogical. The content is simple but not simplistic, and assumes people are on a journey of a process of exploring faith. “Ask Anything” is a resource that helps Christians authentically accompany their pre-Christian friends on that journey and encourage them towards faith. The course was successfully trialled at Crossway with 1500 people in small groups. It has also spread as a resource to a website and radio spots, but its facilitating of question-driven faith-sharing in small groups remains its most strategic use.
  • Publication
    Emerging Missional Churches in Australia
    2012 Cronshaw, Darren ; Bolger, Ryan
    This chapter is a description of three emerging missional church case studies in Melbourne, Australia: Eastern Hills, Croydon; Urban Life, Ringwood; and Solace, Alphington. It discusses their practice of alternative worship, inclusive community and hospitality, incarnational mission - engaging the world, and empowering and shared leadership.
  • Publication
    The Continuing Conversion of the Australian Church: a missional conversation with Darrell Guder
    (Pacifica; 27 (2) ) 2014-02 Devenish, Stuart ; Cronshaw, Darren
    The Christian church in Australia faces a challenging mission context. In our secular yet post-secular, post-Christian yet multi-religious society, Christianity is becoming increasingly marginalised. Christianity’s challenge is to rediscover its missional imperative through a process of innovative recalibration that is true its founding apostolic gospel, and also reflects the “new” cultural context in which it finds itself in 21st century Australia. This article engages in a missional conversation with Darrell Guder, a seminal thinker in the Gospel and our Culture Network, seeking insights into how the global conversation on mission might apply the Australian context. Guder visited Melbourne, Australia in May-June 2012, during which time he challenged church leaders to rediscover the missional nature of Christianity. His was a summons to the continuing conversion of the Australian church, especially focusing on the need to reimagine church around mission, reclaim the centrality of evangelism, confront the reductionism of the gospel and foster interdependence among congregations and with the global church.
  • Publication
    The Relational Teacher: Sharing Life as Vocational Essence
    2018 Cronshaw, Darren ; Ball, Les ; Bolt, Peter
    The essence of a theology teacher’s vocation is about ‘sharing life’ as a ‘relational teacher’. Andrew Root in The Relational Pastor (IVP 2013) argues that relationships are not merely a tool of ministry but its very goal. He contends that ministry grounded in ‘place-sharing’ and being with and for others is especially appropriate for our dawning new age, as well as consistent with the essence of Christianity as sharing in the life of others and the life of Christ. This chapter builds on Root’s analysis of ministry to explore the practice of teaching theology as ‘sharing life’ in several directions – sharing life with God in cultivating authentic spirituality, sharing life with faculty colleagues as team and sharing life mutually with students. It also considers how teaching serves to foster sharing life with the communities our students will serve as the ultimate point of evaluation. This is an exercise in reflective practice – establishing a theological basis for ‘The Relational Teacher: Sharing Life as Vocational Essence’ while reflecting personally on how I share life with God, colleagues, students and the world.
  • Publication
    Saving Souls and Listening Hearts: Implications for Missional Leaders from Richard Rohr’s Immortal Diamond
    (Colloquium; 46 (2) ) 2014 Cronshaw, Darren
    This article is an extended review of Rohr’s Immortal Diamond, discussing his encouragement to listen to our true selves, but also extending that posture beyond individual interiority to listen to congregations, cultures and one’s community.
  • Publication
    Early Evangelism and Image-Rich Witnessing: John's Testimony About Jesus in John 1:29-34
    (Melanesian Journal of Theology ) 2006-10 Cronshaw, Darren
    Darren Cronshaw takes an exegetical look at the imagery used in John 1:29-34, and concludes that image-rich witnessing can be a "model for spicing our conversation with witness, and for using images that are rich in meaning for those we talk with". Darren offers several examples from the passage: Jesus as the Lamb of God, Jesus as the pre-existent one, Jesus as the baptiser in the Holy Spirit, and Jesus as the Son of God. The article is rich in theology, but also practical in application. After reading the article you will be challenged to be more creative in sharing truths about Christ in any context, Melanesian or otherwise (from the journal editorial by Doug Hanson).
  • Publication
    REFLECTIONS ON AUSTRALIAN CONTEXTUAL MODELS OF PASTORAL MINISTRY
    2005 Cronshaw, Darren
    Australian historical images – for example, the Aborigine, convict, bushman, gold digger, Anzac ‘digger’, and migrant – are a fruitful source for theological reflection to develop models of ministry. These images and their historical contexts helped shape Australian culture and so shape context for ministry. A conversation between historical themes and Christian tradition suggests a number of complementary models for pastoral ministry in Australia. Spiritual companions, for example, help people relate faith to their journey in everyday life. This model resonates with Aboriginal listening and sensitivity to the sacred, and is at home with the Australian longing for everyday spirituality as articulated by contemporary social commentators such as Michael Leunig. Chaplains get alongside people in the midst of their lives, although colonial chaplains were seen more as distant moral policemen and their role in evangelism was limited by their government employment. As settlement spread through the bush, ministry as shepherding with clergy who cared for their flocks replaced or supplemented chaplaincy. Shepherding, an image rich in nurturing and care, was at home in the rural setting of the colonies, and continues to meaningfully express the pastoral care aspects of local church ministry. The labour movement and the Australian value of a fair go for the underdog suggest a place for ministry as prophetic advocacy; and ministry as service fits Australian humanitarianism, the Anzac spirit and servant leadership popular today even in business circles. Finally, ministers as community hosts reflect both God’s hospitality and the multicultural ethos of Australia that draws people together from different cultures and backgrounds. The pastoral ministry can be imagined and expressed by various models which describe different emphases of ministry, and the most effective models for pastoral ministry in Australia will derive from and critique Australian culture and historical images.
  • Publication
    Vineyard Meets Emerging Missional Churches
    (Australasian Pentecostal Studies ) 2014-01 Downes, Peter ; Cronshaw, Darren
    The Vineyard movement came to Australia with conferences since 1987 and its first churches in 1995, including Cabramatta Vineyard. Vineyard has brought a renewal of understanding about intimacy with God in worship, the healing work of God, and the presence of the Kingdom of God. Following founder John Wimber’s inspiration, Vineyard traditionally invited people to experience God in Sunday worship gatherings as the people pray “Come Holy Spirit”. Yet the Emerging Missional Church has also influenced an increasing number of the thirty Australian Vineyard churches to shape church around mission and to adopt a missional “go to the people” approach and not be content with an attractional “come to us” approach. For example, Greg and Diane Trainor planted Cabramatta Vineyard Church, but have led the church to have less of a emphasis on Sunday gatherings. Instead they have focused on small groups and accountability “Crave” groups as the locus of community, while encouraging the development of spiritual life and missional engagement. “Cabra Vineyard” is thus a helpful case study about prioritising mission while discerning how to still foster intimacy with God through the worship of the gathered congregation.
  • Publication
    Australian Contextual Models of Pastoral Ministry
    2013 Cronshaw, Darren
    Australian historical images – the Aborigine, convict, bushman, gold digger, Anzac ‘digger’, and migrant – are a fruitful source for developing local models of ministry. Spiritual companions help people relate faith to everyday life. This model resonates with Aboriginal sensitivity to the sacred, and is at home with the Australian longing for everyday spirituality articulated by social commentators such as Michael Leunig. Chaplains get alongside people, although colonial chaplains were seen more as distant moral policemen and their evangelism was limited by their government employment. Shepherding was at home in the rural setting of the colonies, and continues to meaningfully express the nurturing aspects of local church ministry. The labour movement and the Australian value of a fair go suggest ministry as prophetic advocacy; and ministry as service fits Australian humanitarianism, the Anzac spirit and servant leadership. Finally, ministers as community hosts reflect God’s hospitality and the multicultural ethos of Australia. Pastoral ministry can be imagined and expressed by various models, and the most effective models for Australia will derive from and critique local culture.